What were you watching yesterday night?

1 Like
1 Like

Mr Bates vs the Post Office. An appalling tale of an IT disaster and gross miscarriage of justice in the UK.

1 Like
2 Likes

Blast from the past.

3 Likes

This movie was great, put tears in my eyes at the end though

2 Likes

:clown_face:

3 Likes

Off-topic: Louis is becoming more and more a panda:) or is it a masked bandit (racoon)?

:clap:t5: :clap:t5: :clap:t5: :clap:t5: :clap:t5:
:dancer:t6:

As always, our indoctrinated friend did great research…while propagandizing some cringe ideology.
Still, the research and resources itself - are stellar as always.

2 Likes

La Storia - Elsa Morante

1 Like

https://www.therealeasyed.com/chris-strachwitz-and-arhoolie-records-this-aint-no-mouse-music/

The stories come alive when you hear them straight from the man who traveled to Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana in the early ’60s to record blues musicians such as Mance Lipscomb, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Big Mama Thornton, and Fred McDowell. Hopkins introduced Strachwitz to his wife’s cousin Clifton Chenier, and in 1965 Strachwitz recorded Chenier in Houston. This led Strachwitz to make dozens of Cajun and Creole recordings from New Orleans with musicians such as Beausoleil, Autin Pitre, Amede Ardoin, Canray Fontenot, and others.

Over the years, Strachwitz loaded the car with his tape recorder and microphones to cruise throughout the countryside, and he’d set up on porches, in the fields, at beer joints, and local festivals. In addition to the blues, he added country, bluegrass, old-time, Mexican regional, Tejano, world, jazz, gospel, folk, and polka to the Arhoolie catalog.

[In 1965, four years before Woodstock, he] recorded and released Country Joe and The Fish’s “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag” in exchange for the publishing rights, which earned him quite a bit of money after Joe got thrown on the stage at Woodstock a few years later and the moment was preserved on film and soundtrack. The cash infusion helped finance Strachwitz’s field recordings and fueled his record consumer passion. (He gave the publishing [rights] back to Joe after 20 years.)

Strachwitz died last year at age 92.

4 Likes