Which process monitor do you use?

Top, Htop, Btop, Bpytop or do you use something else?

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99% of the time System Monitor gets my fix

The other 1% of the time where I’m trying to troubleshoot something, I’ll just hit up htop :+1:

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I use whatever is installed. :wink:

htop tends to be a good compromise between performance and functionality but all of them are fine.

That being said, I mostly only use those for checking CPU load. I tend to use ps_mem to look at per application memory consumption and iotop to see what is causing disk related bottlenecks.

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from the cmd line, I prefer glances.

For GUI based monitoring in general I use telegraf to push metrics into Grafana/Influx.

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I hardly ever need to use any of the mentioned monitors. I have %CPU, %RAM, and CPU temp always in view in my waybar panel. They’re in light grey text if all is well and then change color if there’s a spike.

If I can’t figure out the issue, I use top.

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In most cases htop. But sometimes also glances.

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Since glances is preinstalled at EOS, I started it in the terminal on a trial basis. It worked, but I got the following message:

You are using Glances version 3.2.4, however version 3.2.4.2 is available.
You should consider upgrading using: pip install --upgrade glances

When I ran pip install --upgrade glances

I got the message: bash: pip: Command not found.

Otherwise I use htop.

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Install the python-pip package.

https://archlinux.org/packages/community/any/glances/. Isyour system uptodate?

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htop most of the time.
when i need more detailed stats (like ongoing uploads/downloads throughput and more) i use bashtop

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Sure. But strangely enough, not glances. There were also never error messages during the updates that glances could not be updated with.

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You should never use pip to upgrade something provided by a package. That will cause problems and usually break your ability to update the system.

I would just wait for the package to be updated.

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btop usually.

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Agreed. IMHO, pip/pip3 should only be used to manage Python modules.

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On an Arch-based distro, it should only be used to manage them in a localized fashion such as a pyenv or similar. You should never use it with sudo to manage system-wide modules.

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Yep. pip/pip3 will install for the local user only. And, I agree that it is considered a best practice to use the pip/pip3 cmd from either pyenv or virtualenv. I use the later for better separation of modules between projects.

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Bottom is what I use.

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Gee - nobody here uses conky for this? It just sits there, under all others, but available without an additional command when a question occurs… saves opening even a terminal (and I’m on drop-down mode).

For those who don’t know my conkys, here’s the ‘main’ one:

Yes - the date’s old - but current at the time, and still running now… Added bonus - calendar, weather, package information, and a music playing display with cover art…

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I’m noob and I use htop and, sometimes, system monitor (GUI). I’ve just tried glances and got same message than @Balder, but, pacman says it’s up to date:

# Checking version
[triby@eos ~]$: glances --version
Glances v3.2.4 with PsUtil v5.9.0
Log file: /home/triby/.local/share/glances/glances.log

# Message after executing
[triby@eos ~]$: glances
You are using Glances version 3.2.4, however version 3.2.4.2 is available.
You should consider upgrading using: pip install --upgrade glances

# Searching on pacman
[triby@eos ~]$: pacman -Ss glances
community/glances 3.2.4-2 [instalado]
    CLI curses-based monitoring tool

I don’t understand. :fearful:

3.2.4.2 is different than 3.2.4-2.

The thing after the dash is the pkgrel, it isn’t part of the upstream version.

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Good to know, thanks!

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