System not freeing up memory/Programs continually using up more and more memory

cat /proc/meminfo gives detailed memory usage info.
sudo vmstat -s is less detailed but easier to read.

2 Likes

This is a pretty good look at it on KDE

cat /proc/meminfo

[ricklinux@eos-plasma ~]$ cat /proc/meminfo
MemTotal:       32864152 kB
MemFree:        29339204 kB
MemAvailable:   30746412 kB
Buffers:             244 kB
Cached:          1838096 kB
SwapCached:            0 kB
Active:          1884132 kB
Inactive:        1034060 kB
Active(anon):    1088732 kB
Inactive(anon):   106940 kB
Active(file):     795400 kB
Inactive(file):   927120 kB
Unevictable:           0 kB
Mlocked:               0 kB
SwapTotal:      33554428 kB
SwapFree:       33554428 kB
Dirty:             10280 kB
Writeback:             0 kB
AnonPages:       1079888 kB
Mapped:           607228 kB
Shmem:            115820 kB
KReclaimable:      98616 kB
Slab:             317164 kB
SReclaimable:      98616 kB
SUnreclaim:       218548 kB
KernelStack:       15600 kB
PageTables:        20212 kB
NFS_Unstable:          0 kB
Bounce:                0 kB
WritebackTmp:          0 kB
CommitLimit:    49986504 kB
Committed_AS:    5432872 kB
VmallocTotal:   34359738367 kB
VmallocUsed:       58268 kB
VmallocChunk:          0 kB
Percpu:            25472 kB
HardwareCorrupted:     0 kB
AnonHugePages:         0 kB
ShmemHugePages:        0 kB
ShmemPmdMapped:        0 kB
FileHugePages:         0 kB
FilePmdMapped:         0 kB
HugePages_Total:       0
HugePages_Free:        0
HugePages_Rsvd:        0
HugePages_Surp:        0
Hugepagesize:       2048 kB
Hugetlb:               0 kB
DirectMap4k:      579836 kB
DirectMap2M:     6680576 kB
DirectMap1G:    26214400 kB
[ricklinux@eos-plasma ~]$ 

sudo vmstat -s

[ricklinux@eos-plasma ~]$ sudo vmstat -s
[sudo] password for ricklinux: 
     32864152 K total memory
      1616904 K used memory
      1916656 K active memory
      1033284 K inactive memory
     29306428 K free memory
          244 K buffer memory
      1940576 K swap cache
     33554428 K total swap
            0 K used swap
     33554428 K free swap
        11877 non-nice user cpu ticks
           12 nice user cpu ticks
         6879 system cpu ticks
      1318742 idle cpu ticks
         1267 IO-wait cpu ticks
          653 IRQ cpu ticks
          482 softirq cpu ticks
            0 stolen cpu ticks
      1513085 pages paged in
       536841 pages paged out
            0 pages swapped in
            0 pages swapped out
      3350239 interrupts
      9345024 CPU context switches
   1600348872 boot time
         5689 forks
[ricklinux@eos-plasma ~]$ 
1 Like

That’s the one I had in mind :grin: If that’s what telling you that swap’s in use - well, I have no experience with that reading anything but 0 - like so:

     34399228 K total swap
            0 K used swap
     34399228 K free swap

            0 pages swapped in
            0 pages swapped out

so I guess I’m not useful in this context! Good luck - hope someone has a solution for you.

It’s hard to tell if it happens in windows as well - it jumped from staying at 31% memory usage to 35%, then back down to 33%.

$ cat /proc/meminfo
MemTotal: 16399556 kB
MemFree: 10633476 kB
MemAvailable: 13963416 kB
Buffers: 388076 kB
Cached: 3439864 kB
SwapCached: 0 kB
Active: 2313616 kB
Inactive: 2839092 kB
Active(anon): 1318400 kB
Inactive(anon): 424240 kB
Active(file): 995216 kB
Inactive(file): 2414852 kB
Unevictable: 512 kB
Mlocked: 512 kB
SwapTotal: 9227464 kB
SwapFree: 9227464 kB
Dirty: 272 kB
Writeback: 0 kB
AnonPages: 1325536 kB
Mapped: 1182584 kB
Shmem: 432728 kB
KReclaimable: 255856 kB
Slab: 419740 kB
SReclaimable: 255856 kB
SUnreclaim: 163884 kB
KernelStack: 12528 kB
PageTables: 29332 kB
NFS_Unstable: 0 kB
Bounce: 0 kB
WritebackTmp: 0 kB
CommitLimit: 17427240 kB
Committed_AS: 6935340 kB
VmallocTotal: 34359738367 kB
VmallocUsed: 32724 kB
VmallocChunk: 0 kB
Percpu: 11072 kB
HardwareCorrupted: 0 kB
AnonHugePages: 0 kB
ShmemHugePages: 0 kB
ShmemPmdMapped: 0 kB
FileHugePages: 0 kB
FilePmdMapped: 0 kB
HugePages_Total: 0
HugePages_Free: 0
HugePages_Rsvd: 0
HugePages_Surp: 0
Hugepagesize: 2048 kB
Hugetlb: 0 kB
DirectMap4k: 425648 kB
DirectMap2M: 10004480 kB
DirectMap1G: 7340032 kB

$ sudo vmstat -s
16399556 K total memory
1604028 K used memory
2175456 K active memory
1437608 K inactive memory
12214488 K free memory
375784 K buffer memory
2205256 K swap cache
9227464 K total swap
0 K used swap
9227464 K free swap
9018 non-nice user cpu ticks
241 nice user cpu ticks
7574 system cpu ticks
2681010 idle cpu ticks
867 IO-wait cpu ticks
914 IRQ cpu ticks
221 softirq cpu ticks
0 stolen cpu ticks
1984590 pages paged in
262414 pages paged out
0 pages swapped in
0 pages swapped out
7459561 interrupts
14915457 CPU context switches
1600355959 boot time
3452 forks
[tez@tez-ms7a33 ~]$ cat /proc/meminfo
MemTotal: 16399556 kB
MemFree: 10633476 kB
MemAvailable: 13963416 kB
Buffers: 388076 kB
Cached: 3439864 kB
SwapCached: 0 kB
Active: 2313616 kB
Inactive: 2839092 kB
Active(anon): 1318400 kB
Inactive(anon): 424240 kB
Active(file): 995216 kB
Inactive(file): 2414852 kB
Unevictable: 512 kB
Mlocked: 512 kB
SwapTotal: 9227464 kB
SwapFree: 9227464 kB
Dirty: 272 kB
Writeback: 0 kB
AnonPages: 1325536 kB
Mapped: 1182584 kB
Shmem: 432728 kB
KReclaimable: 255856 kB
Slab: 419740 kB
SReclaimable: 255856 kB
SUnreclaim: 163884 kB
KernelStack: 12528 kB
PageTables: 29332 kB
NFS_Unstable: 0 kB
Bounce: 0 kB
WritebackTmp: 0 kB
CommitLimit: 17427240 kB
Committed_AS: 6935340 kB
VmallocTotal: 34359738367 kB
VmallocUsed: 32724 kB
VmallocChunk: 0 kB
Percpu: 11072 kB
HardwareCorrupted: 0 kB
AnonHugePages: 0 kB
ShmemHugePages: 0 kB
ShmemPmdMapped: 0 kB
FileHugePages: 0 kB
FilePmdMapped: 0 kB
HugePages_Total: 0
HugePages_Free: 0
HugePages_Rsvd: 0
HugePages_Surp: 0
Hugepagesize: 2048 kB
Hugetlb: 0 kB
DirectMap4k: 425648 kB
DirectMap2M: 10004480 kB
DirectMap1G: 7340032 kB
[tez@tez-ms7a33 ~]$ sudo vmstat -s
[sudo] password for tez:
16399556 K total memory
1710404 K used memory
2345028 K active memory
2846168 K inactive memory
10596144 K free memory
388516 K buffer memory
3704492 K swap cache
9227464 K total swap
0 K used swap
9227464 K free swap
43670 non-nice user cpu ticks
247 nice user cpu ticks
28560 system cpu ticks
4115287 idle cpu ticks
1503 IO-wait cpu ticks
3145 IRQ cpu ticks
768 softirq cpu ticks
0 stolen cpu ticks
3089934 pages paged in
734302 pages paged out
0 pages swapped in
0 pages swapped out
26046379 interrupts
51537072 CPU context switches
1600355959 boot time
4151 forks

This is just from about 30-60 minutes of uptime.

Which kernels have you tried?

I’m going to try downgrading to 5.8.7 now to see if that works.

Also try linux-lts.

3 Likes

You can compare it to mine side by side. If i had to guess i would question what software packages you have installed. I am running kde and it is flawless. It is so fast and so responsive.

On my system i have BTRFS installed without luks encryption using @2000 guide with timeshift and snapshots.

The only packages i have installed
korganizer
thunderbird
chromium
gimp
gparted
rhythmbox
celluloid
lollypop
spotify
libreoffice
simple screen recorder
pamac-aur-git
qbittorrent
vlc
package-kit-qt5
All EndeavourOS Apps From the Repo

I wonder what software packages you have installed? Is it a software issue?
Your list is huge compared to mine.

It sounds more hardware-related given that

Have any idea what might be causing it?

I’m just asking because there aren’t that many components. If memory is tested, and video card changed and cpu? Cpu’s don’t normally go bad. So we are left with the motherboard, power supply or drives which i doubt. If it isn’t the install which i can’t confirm? Then?

Edit: It also doesn’t make sense if it’s hardware then you would see the same behavior on Windows.

If it was me i would test the power supply properly, the drive with a utility and reinstall. If after all that then your only left with the board. I would be running it in Windows to see for a good length of time to verify.

I’ve heard first-hand instances of where the PC case was causing weird issues. I don’t rule anything out any more. :sweat_smile:

2 Likes

How’s that??
Accidental static electricity or something like that?

1 Like

I think it was something to do with EM fields - the case worked fine with a different set of components. It was truly, truly weird.

1 Like

I don’t like what’s going on at all. I mounted my NVMe (which I use for games and pictures) to try to resize it for another EndevOS installation but…


Bam. 1 TB of data gone in an instant.

I doubt you have EM fields in your PC case which are strong enough to affect your computer.

Maybe it was grounding. A long time ago, I had an improvised, homemade, wooden PC case, and grounding was a problem on it, since wood is not a very good conductor. :rofl:

I think the fans generated static charge in some of the components. Connecting all the screws (of hard drives, motherboard, back panel, etc) with copper wire and running it to the case of the PSU fixed the problem.

3 Likes

It’s ghost in the shell :ghost:

2 Likes

Well i guess that points in some right direction what the issue is. So if you’ve lost everything then you won’t have any option but to do a fresh install. I would just try a new m.2 drive and install on it. Or reinstall on that one but you better wipe it clean and test it.

Edit: You said you have two drives? So is that just your Windows drive you are talking about? :thinking:

I have three drives: Two SATA SSDs, one windows, and one linux, and my m.2 SSD that I store most of my files on. My EndevOS install froze when I booted it up after testing my Windows install. Think my PC doesn’t like it when I boot up different OSes. But man, I’m so out of ideas. I’m probably, at this point, just going to replace my mobo and possibly RAM, and wipe my Linux install. Once I reinstall EndevOS, I’ll install my original programs bit by bit and keep all of you updated on what the culprit is.

I do have a question though: Could Windows 10 possibly be causing this, even if it’s on a different drive?

It really should haven’t anything to do with it as far as I’m concerned unless you have done something funky with the installs.

What does your fstab show.

cat /etc/fstab