Fedora 33 might have btrfs as default

Looks like Fedora 33 might have btrfs as the default file system.

Pudge

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interesting, but from what I see btrfs is not necessary a better fs for the average user, expecially on a ssd. quite the contrary:
https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=linux-50-filesystems

I’d rather stick with ext4 or maybe f2fs

Exactly, which is why this announcement is raising a lot of eye brows. :bomb:

Pudge

How many days you used btrfs?

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never used it. i went on and researched it out of curiosity. and the first result was the benchmark above which kind of speak for themselves. if there is no performance benefit, i see no reason to use it. I mean a fs is something you set up and forget, if there is no strong benefit then there is no reason switch to it or tinker about with it. Maybe for some special use cases, but as daily drive for a work machine… what’s the use?

Okay then

There is nothing else left to say.

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I use BTRFS but for a very specialized use. My set up is as follows:

250 Gib NVME for /boot/efi, /, and linuxswap partitions.
2 x 1 Tib SSDs in BTRFS RAID 0 for my /home partition (effectively a 2 Tib partiton).

I do so for the performance increases of the RAID function in BTRFS.

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I had a positive experience with btrfs on openSUSE, but I feel like I might be in the minority. Having snapshots integrated with the updates saved me a couple times. In any case, I’m interested to see what Fedora does with it.

Not bad, so far, only so far, since the Anaconda installer leaves much to be desired, especially in partitioning and installing the nvidia drivers.
Otherwise it runs well.

as someone who has used Red Hat Inc. since 2010 and Fedora as core OS for past 7 years, that might not mean anything in reality for business, maybe some new users will leave default config and not use LVM.
I work in a company where we use legacy systems from before 1990 and we have to have a ZFS file system and we use BSD, all the rest is 99% Red Hat Linux Ent or CentOS or Fedora.
my team and me personally updates the last version and don’t reinstall.

My home PC changed 3 laptops and was never reinstalled dd to new SSD upgrade since 2014.

So in short even if it happens for a long term user as me will mean probably nothing.

Alex

What desktop did you install?
Edit: I’m trying xfce

I’d tolerate nearly any performance hit for the near instantaneous snapshot creating and restore feature btrfs offers. After using lvm-snapshots (ext4) for years and testing btrfs-snapshots I abandoned ext4 for btrfs. I don’t see me changing that in the foreseeable future (years to come).

Install the default desktop of fedora, Gnome 3, but I don’t have it anymore … it’s gone without asking for forgiveness.
:grinning: :maté:

I’ve used btrfs on Manjaro and Arch for 3 years with no major problems. Occasionally I need to defrag the files in /var/log/journal/ to prevent the “Flush Journal to Persistent Storage” from taking too long during startup. The only other minor issue is that downloaded torrents get highly fragmented. Both of these are due to btrfs’s COW feature.

I had a bad experience with openSUSE Tumbleweed installed on btrfs a few weeks ago. The problem started after my first update. It was likely a bug in openSUSE’s startup process, which would unmount every subvolume except /, /var/ and /tmp/ almost immediately after mounting them. Upon login, /home got mounted again, but the other subvolumes were not mounted as needed. I rebooted several times, and the same thing happened every time. At that point I deleted Tumbleweed out of frustration.

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…years ago. Numerous times, out of the blue, the filesystem reverted to Read Only. I got so fed up with it that later i reinstalled as ext4 + Timeshift, but it was the beginning of the end for me. Went to a certain other roller from there, but again only ext4.

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Yeah, ext4 for me, for the foreseeable future. If it works, don’t fix it.

Besides, I’m not a big fan of btrfs snapshots with timeshift. I like to keep my snapshots on a different HDD, so I can just nuke the root if I want to and still be able to restore the snapshot.

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Ditto.

Flexibility, options.

I remember seeing you on their forum, as well as many others here. I will always be thankful to that “other roller” for introducing me to the Arch ecosystem.

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There is no user friendly tools here, besides Welcome and its depends. Welcome to the real - or so - Archlinux world. It hurts sometimes really hard.

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I of course like the ideas behind btrfs, but jeez…

:bug: :bug: :bug:

Only thing you really want from filesystem in my opinion - reliability!
For some reason contemporary developments of any software lacks it a lot :grimacing:

ext4 for me :slight_smile: