EOS installation date

Out of curiosity, I looked at when the EOS was installed on my machine. On August 22, 2018, that is, it was still an Antergos system, which was then converted to EOS last November. Joekamprad had great merits in this. This gave me the opportunity to ask when my forum members installed their own first EOS system.

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Around February. I never used Antergos :slight_smile:

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sadly we do not come up with the idea from beginning, but we do add ISO date to os-release info you can check with:
cat /etc/os-release
or take it from log where you will get install date:
head -c 39 /var/log/Calamares.log

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$ LANG=C stat /

File: /
Size: 237 Blocks: 0 IO Block: 4096 directory
Device: fe00h/65024d Inode: 128 Links: 16
Access: (0755/drwxr-xr-x) Uid: ( 0/ root) Gid: ( 0/ root)
Access: 2020-05-29 20:52:48.234187003 -0300
Modify: 2020-05-29 20:52:48.227520294 -0300
Change: 2020-05-29 20:52:48.227520294 -0300
Birth: 2020-05-29 20:22:41.181395000 -0300

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I used Antergos on, and off in 2017/2018, then went briefly back to Manjaro (mainly because Antergos net-installer was frustratingly buggy) and finally switched to Endeavour on the 23rd of December last year, right after the net-install component was introduced.

Couldn’t be happier since!

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This is the longest lasting EOS install; about two months now, but I have used it almost non stop since the beta.

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Must have been playing something where deuces are wild…

┌15:12:23 WD= [~]
└───freebird@aerie ─▶$ head -c 39 /var/log/Calamares.log
=== START CALAMARES 3.2.17.1
2020-02-22

Second of a lot of installs :grin:

[andi@endeavouros ~]$ LANG=C stat /
File: /
Size: 4096 Blocks: 8 IO Block: 4096 directory
Device: 826h/2086d Inode: 2 Links: 18
Access: (0755/drwxr-xr-x) Uid: ( 0/ root) Gid: ( 0/ root)
Access: 2020-05-28 18:00:27.462308329 +0200
Modify: 2020-05-23 21:03:38.523888317 +0200
Change: 2020-05-23 21:03:38.523888317 +0200
Birth: 2019-06-04 20:36:27.000000000 +0200

Yesterday was the birthday of my Endeavour OS
:birthday: :beer: :grin:

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Birth: 2019-09-28 01:31:35.000000000 +0200

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3/2/2020 for me, so just over 3 months and still going strong

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File: /
Size: 4096 Blocks: 8 IO Block: 4096 directory
Device: 802h/2050d Inode: 2 Links: 18
Access: (0755/drwxr-xr-x) Uid: ( 0/ root) Gid: ( 0/ root)
Access: 2020-06-02 12:25:50.700136286 +0200
Modify: 2020-06-05 11:19:46.767765887 +0200
Change: 2020-06-05 11:19:46.767765887 +0200
Birth: 2020-06-02 12:23:31.000000000 +0200

New user as you can see.

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Birth: 2019-04-07 16:48:26.000000000 +0100
This is an Antergos installation converted to Endeavouros, the partition copied over from spinning rust to nvme and from mbr core-i5 box circa 2009 to uefi and Ryzen7 2700.

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I installed my system on August 16, 2019 (not in July as I had originally thought).

Screenshot_2020-06-06_09-23-24

I formerly had used Antergos. When EndeavourOS was released I downloaded the ISO and, when Antergos stopped being updated, I installed EOS (at least that’s what I remember - it seems an “eternity” ago - and I have experienced no major problems with EOS, nothing that could not be corrected by answers to my questions here on this forum).

THANKS to everyone here. And THANKS to the creators/maintainers. You have made a positively superb operating system.

Lawrence

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Huh, I actually have kept this specific EOS installation longer than I thought!

 Birth: 2020-02-14 21:12:07.000000000 +0100
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I’m a EOS noob and installed it yesterday. I have tried it on Virtualbox before but never installed it on bare metal.

I have used Ubuntu, Arch, Pop_OS and Manjaro on my machines. Now that I got my new X1 Carbon from Lenovo, decided to test EOS on real hardware. So far so good.

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I tried to install Antergos when it was around but it didn’t work. I was pretty new to Linux so maybe I didn’t know what i was doing

I installed Endeavour whenever it first popped up on distrowatch, I think it was sometime last year

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The Antergos Installer was a big problem.
It often didn’t work (although the Distro when installed worked great!) because the first thing it did was to auto-update itself IN THE BACKGROUND without TELLING you.
And it didn’t even tell you when it was done.

So if you didn’t know that, you often started the install process with either an outdated or corrupt installer. I think at leat 90% of the people saying they failed to install Antergos suffered from not knowing this.

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Two years ago, when I installed Antergos, maybe the installer wasn’t so problematic yet because I had the installation successfully for the first time. What made me more uncomfortable at the time was that I could only run it with the LTS Kernel for a while, which is still the case with the EOS anyway.

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Two years ago, when I installed Antergos, maybe the installer wasn’t so problematic yet because I had the installation successfully for the first time. What made me more uncomfortable at the time was that I could only run it with the LTS Kernel for a while, which is still the case with the EOS anyway.

May I suggest that you install the grub customizer program [ yay -S grub-customizer ]. This will allow you to set the latest Linux version to be the default kernel while still retaining the LTS version “just in case.” Just be very careful in using this program as you could cause some major damage to your installed system if you use it incorrectly. I suggest that all you do is to move the latest kernel to the top.

This is how I have mine configured:

Screenshot_2020-06-14_09-48-49

I hope that this is of some interest and help to you.

Lawrence

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ringo@BlackClover ~ % awk -F "[[ ]" 'NR==1 {print $2;}' /var/log/pacman.log
2019-06-22
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