TIP for Mirrorlist - This is better than Reflector

TIP
When it comes to download speed for upgrading packages I’ve found

rate-arch-mirrors
to be superior.

Try it and you won’t be disappointed.

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Have you tried something like

reflector --score 10 --fastest 5

?

How does the list generated by rate-arch-mirrors differ?

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Is it a wrapper around reflector? :thinking: :stuck_out_tongue:

This is a tool, which fetches mirrors, skips outdated/syncing Arch Linux mirrors, then uses info about submarine cables and internet exchanges to jump between countries and find fast mirrors.

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Hi everyone! thanks for having a look at the tool (I’ve found the forum as one of referring sites on github)

manuel, it’s a completely separate tool, written in Rust, built to replace Reflector.
The idea is to run it before each system upgrade, so this should not take an eternity to find fast mirrors.

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Welcome!

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“It’s written in Rust, btw” is the new “I use Arch, btw”, I swear1 :rofl:

It’s a great tool, generates a mirrorlist very similar to reflector, ranked by speed (the top three mirrors are pretty much always the same for me) only at a fraction of the time… Very nice.

Welcome to the forum, @westandskif, thanks for the tool!


1 I’ve got to learn Rust, if anything, for the memes. “It’s written in C++, btw” just doesn’t sound as cool… Rust is much more hipster. :bearded_person:t4:

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Thanks for the info! :smile:
Sounds very interesting.

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Interestng tool, although I can’t fathom needing to update mirrors prior to every update. I generally just run it every few months when I think of it, and that’s it. But still interesting.

I generally use topgrade to update as well.

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Yeah, I agree, unless you’re constantly on the move, I see no need to update my mirror list more than once or twice a year. Still, this program does it well, so I’ll keep it. :slight_smile:

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thank you!
I just want to follow arch wiki recommendations:

It is recommended to repeat this process before every system upgrade to keep the list of mirrors up-to-date.

Otherwise there’s a chance of updating the system using outdated mirrors and also I’m not sure how it works when a mirror is half up-to-date.

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Jeebus. Well, I certainly am not one to update like a good Arch user. You’re much more diligent than I.

Hm. That seems kind of excessive… let me ask in #archlinux-wiki.

Edit: was deemed to be “excessive” so has been updated:

:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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I see and it was excessive for me too :slight_smile:
Once I finished the tool, it’s no longer.
The alias I’m using - https://github.com/westandskif/rate-arch-mirrors#example-of-everyday-use

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Very interesting, but why doesn’t it have a built in save-to-mirrorlist tool?

Anyway, the suggested bash script / Alias is way overcomplicated imho.
This is what I came up with on the spot:

alias update-mirrors="sudo mv /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist.bak | rate-arch-mirrors --entry-country SE | sudo tee /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist"

Doesn’t have to be more complicated than that.

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Hi! I just haven’t gotten around to it + since we are all kind of control freaks (arch users), so it seemed fine to leave it up to a user — whether to drop comments or not, whether to backup a file or not, how many copies are needed, etc.

Plus it doesn’t require any root permissions atm

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Oh I didn’t mean an automatic save, but like the reflector’s --save (filename) flag.
It is a flag that would be handy, so you only had to type rate-arch-mirrors --entry-country XX --save /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist if you wanted to pipe the result to the mirror list.

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Sure! this one is coming - https://github.com/westandskif/rate-arch-mirrors/issues/2

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