Questions about Endeavour

Hello everybody!

I’ve used Endeavour on a virtual machine and I like it a lot. I’m thinking of switching to Endeavour but I have a few questions.

First of all, I’ve been using Linux for about 6 months now and I know how to solve simple problems. Unfortunately, due to upcoming exams, I can’t spend a lot of time on problems that might take a long time to solve (at least for the next 4 months).

Questions:
1- Is there a possibility that I can make the system unusable with a simple system update? Or am I likely to break the system by changing a “not so important” setting?
Manjaro seems a bit more stable in terms of stability, but I am hesitant to switch to it due to past events
(I may be exaggerating the “instability of Arch”).

2- I have never used an arch-based distribution in the long run.
Are there a lot of technical details that I need to grasp to get used to? Or are these things that I won’t find difficult with my basic and intermediate knowledge?

3- And how long does it usually take to get this ‘technical knowledge’ experience? I can spare 1-2 hours a day just for endeavour (I might be exaggerating since I haven’t used an Arch-based distro for a long time).

Anything is possible.

IMO This is more likely to break your system than an update.

It’s less stable historically.

Follow my guide or the wiki for maintenance, and you’ll be fine.

Depends on you. Everyone is different. I can teach my dog how to Julienne a carrot before a lot of people can learn linux. It just depends on the person. If you’ve made it this far, you’re probably fine.

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If the stability of the system is your priority, I would suggest not making any system-wide tweaks if you don’t have a compelling reason to.

Just install the system with the desktop environment of your choice. Configure your desktop and use your system normally.

Keep things simple and if you would need to make any system-wide configuration, you could always ask the forum first.

Also when it comes to updating, Arch (-based system) getting the most recent packages rather frequently, there is always a possibility that some bug will creep into some package and cause a breakage of some fuctionality.

I would update my system, perhaps once a week. Check the list of the packages to be updated. Check here on the forum (or on Arch’s incl. the news pages) if there are some reports about anything causing some issues.

Consult EnOS’ discovery and ArchWiki and read on subjects of your immediate interest and use.
ArchWiki may seem a bit overwhelming at the first sigh. Read and reread and take it in by bits and pieces.

Keep It Simple, and you will be fine.

And also welcome to EnOS’ community @haakn!

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forgive if i sound rude ( no my intention )

Read your questions. that should give you answer
More important why you want use Arch base distro ? Just liking distro coz it look cool or for the meme is pointless IMO + prob will end bad .

my advice is keep use VM ( use it more each day ) learn as much as can in safety of vm , keep your system your happy in for Exams … re think agian after.

choice your…

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This is sound advice. My computer rarely changes anymore, and I do a lot of VM’s and stuff to play/learn/practice on.

Boring is not so bad sometimes.

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Anyone who has had the opportunity to compare both distros over a longer period of time can confirm this. In theory, it is a good thing to test all new packages for a while, but practice shows time and again that it is possible to introduce errors that were not previously present in the arch base.

So YES, EndeavourOS is more stable in my opinion.

Sounds like Arch and Arch based distro’s are not your thing.

Things will break. You can count on that.

You will need technical knowledge. Don’t count on people on this forum to be able to help (because sometimes nobody on the forum has a solution to your problem - and no matter how much ‘googling’ you do it does not help).

EndeavourOS is aimed at intermediate users. If you only have basic knowledge of linux then you are not doing yourself any favours by using a distro aimed at intermediate users.

I wonder where are all the newbies coming from? Who is spreading fudd about EOS being good for newbies?

Edited for clarification.

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image

:yum:

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either have I. signed on the middle of last year. it’s fantastic. find floodymechanics’s ‘survival guide’ and write down all the monthy updating and cleaning ritual and that’s your special knowledge.
the moves you need to make in the terminal to give the OS love are easy. I didn’t find Endeavour especially difficult but I did ask a lot of questions like you are doing now.

#1–without foreknowledge anyone can break any distro at any time. arch is not special that way. I’ve broken everything I tried including fedora…running right into the AUR as soon as you install it like the village idiot might break it. that is me, too.

3- And how long does it usually take to get this ‘technical knowledge’ experience? I can spare 1-2 hours a day just for endeavour (I might be exaggerating since I haven’t used an Arch-based distro for a long time).

again. arch is not special that way. any distro has a period of ‘getting to know how it works and how it does things.’ this is no different and not hard. you login, you surf, you update, you run your programs it’s all the same. a little more terminal-centric but no dramatic. you don’t need sorcery or a stallman-like brain as much as you would need one for deb or fed.

it’s a great daily driver.

Great approach you have: dabble an hour a day.
I guarantee you that will turn into 2 and then 3 then half a day, then all day and this will be primary. It has that kind of charm.

get over the mental barrier you have. I think the arch community loves the hard swaggy reputation of arch (overstated in my opinion but you’ve seen the memes, right;)) but Endeavour removes that stuff and gives it a mass appeal. As stable an OS as I’ve ever used.

a couple pennies

Why rush and switch from VM now to bare metal? If this is your only machine, why not wait till after exams. Schooling should be first, you will have a lot of time to play later.
Welcome to the forums. :wave:

P.S. Just think of how much you may learn over the coming months.

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First of all, I’ve been using Linux for about 6 months now and I know how to solve simple problems. Unfortunately, due to upcoming exams, I can’t spend a lot of time on problems that might take a long time to solve (at least for the next 4 months).

Prioritize your exams and the need for stability, and getting your schooling done without adding the potential risk of trying a new system just for the fun.

Questions:
1- Is there a possibility that I can make the system unusable with a simple system update? Or am I likely to break the system by changing a “not so important” setting?
Manjaro seems a bit more stable in terms of stability, but I am hesitant to switch to it due to past events
(I may be exaggerating the “instability of Arch”).

There is certainly the possibility of experiencing breakages by doing regular updates and/or messing up settings. No one can reliably tell you otherwise. Be very suspicious of anyone who says that the risk is minimal. It might not happen, or it might happen. Those people who tell you not to worry do not have to bear the consequences, you do. Arch based systems are rolling releases and regular updates can affect everything from small functionality to major issues. This is not to say these problems occur regularly, but they can happen. Everything from your printer not working after a driver update, to the display server crashing after a component update like Mesa (which just happened to me), to grub updates making your system unbootable. I do not mean to scare you off, just warn you of the possibilities. If you are not in the mindset to troubleshoot any and all potential problems, stay with the stable system you have, at least until your school schedule allows you more free time.

2- I have never used an arch-based distribution in the long run.
Are there a lot of technical details that I need to grasp to get used to? Or are these things that I won’t find difficult with my basic and intermediate knowledge?

3- And how long does it usually take to get this ‘technical knowledge’ experience? I can spare 1-2 hours a day just for endeavour (I might be exaggerating since I haven’t used an Arch-based distro for a long time).

Linux requires more diligence and keeping an open mind. It can also require more free time. If you have a willingness to learn, are excited by learning new things, and possess some searching skills, you can easily run Linux in a very stable and successful way. Arch based systems require more diligence than Debian based systems, just because of the nature of rolling release vs static release systems. No one can tell you how long it takes to acquire knowledge, that’s up to you. Good luck. :slight_smile:

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@sammiev @eznix
When my indy distro went belly up last year my instincts told me this was the best landing. In the middle of work/edu/lifelines/bank. Stressful. But not hard. There’s nothing wrong with having guts and doing it–I see no value in dissuading but I offer only opinion and another POV.
The odds are in OP’s favor for a seamless transition.

I think that’s the narrative on /r/archlinux: https://www.reddit.com/r/archlinux/s/d1zqqZ5YcP

And additionally, it is the only well-known distro (afaik) that’s Arch-“associated” and not Manjaro.

Sounds like the OP has a working system in a VM and if this is there only computer and going into exams, then wait till exams are over. If the OP has more than one computer, then go for it only if they have the time to invest. It can be a pain to find software that works in Linux like it does in Windows for new comers.
Education should come first, this is only my 2 cents.

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excellent point. I was definitely presenting the in case of emergency break glass scenario if it came to it. Or if he wanted the transition. it ain’t broke, true.