[not a bug] ESP should be on /boot, not /boot/esp

I don’t use grub (except in unusual circumstances) but I always prefer /boot/efi - it works very well with rEFInd as well as being compatible with the setup on MOST other systems. I suppose if you are a single booter, the other makes some sense, but I can’t see making an effort to change it…

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ESP is just another word for EFI. It’s the same thing. ESP has been used but mostly it is referred to as EFI. /boot/efi

I think that is what @BobCollins is referring that /boot/esp is deprecated. (No longer used)

Also probably why the installer no longer needs to have BOTH the esp and boot flags set on the /boot/efi partition. Only the boot flag is needed.

I have always used /boot/efi as mount point and flagged as /boot in the window below when installing.

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It used to be different a while back. Manjaro may still even do it that way. You used to have to set both flags. I have a post here somewhere about it. Another package changed and it was no longer needed for calamares. Let me see if i can dig it up.

This isn’t the post but @joekamprad explains it in the thread. Although i am not sure this is exactly what the OP is referring to.

That flag has not been needed for years, tho.

Mounting your esp to /boot has some downsides as it moves your kernels inside the esp. systemd-boot requires this and I had to make my esp 800MB to support multi-booting with all the kernels distros keep around these days.

If you want to move it I would recommend switching it to /efi if you are using grub.

That being said, you should be able to mount it wherever you want. Mounting it as a /boot/efi isn’t deprecated as far as I know.

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Do you share the same ESP for all the different distros, mounted at /boot for each for having a functioning multi-boot system using systemd-boot?

Yes. I have a single ESP partition.

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Great! I’ve never tried systemd-boot, not knowing how it handles multi-booting. But by your description it seems rather straightforward. So just to make sure if I get it right: all the kernels installed from different systems will reside in the same ESP and then systemd-boot will add them to a boot menu from which you could choose which one to boot?

EFI System Partition :wink:

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If you have no kernel name overlaps than yes, you can just add them to /boot.

If you have kernel name overlaps, you will need to handle that manually somehow. How to handle that will depend on the distro in question. One way is using symlinks. Some distros allow you to specify an alternate kernel location.

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Seems a bit over my paygrade but hey, it’s about time I get a raise :wink:

I’ll start experimenting on a spare machine to see if I can get the basics right. Thanks for your replies and explanation!

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Feel free to reach out to me if you need any help.

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Yes i get it. I guess the word is depricated. It’s the same thing to me ESP … EFI. :upside_down_face:

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Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) and Unified EFI (UEFI)

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Sure, thanks a lot!
:wave:t4:

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Intel developed the original Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) specifications. In 2005, UEFI deprecated EFI 1.10 (the final release of EFI). :laughing:

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hm so EFI is the one depricated then :upside_down_face:
Only UEFI (Interface) and ESP (partition)

I will keep this in mind up from now … we do have the first non-Bios system also now in my house a ThinkCentre (miniPC)

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