How to revert to a pre-update system / blacklist all updates?

Hi all,

I recently moved from Linux Mint to Endeavour, and had everything set up the way I wanted (intermediate Linux user) for months, only to allow Endeavour to update and completely kill my (production) machine. This never happened to me in about 10 years of Mint. Plasma no longer starts and none of the solutions on the forums work. :frowning:

How can I revert back to a pre-update system, and force Endeavour to never update so that my system doesn’t break again?

Not sure if that would be the appropriate course of action on a rolling release Arch-based system.

However, you could try to roll back the updates to the state of the repos at a certain date:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Arch_Linux_Archive#How_to_restore_all_packages_to_a_specific_date

Thanks. I get that, but I would like to use Endeavour as my main work OS and cannot afford to lose access to my DE every few weeks when the system update breaks something…

Have you considered then that perhaps another distro with less frequent updates would be more suitable for your use case?

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A possible solution is outlined here:
https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=201517
(at least after skipping the typical Arch forum banter)

In general I’m not aware of as simple sudo revert-update command, I don’t think it exists.
Unless you have a backup from before the update, I think you’re out of luck.
You could manually go through the pacman log and manually “update” each package to the previous version, but that’s probably lots of work.

As far as blacklisting goes, you can manually blacklist specific packages.
https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/pacman#Skip_package_from_being_upgraded

If you don’t want any package to update, just don’t use the yay or pacman command. But this will eventually result in a partially updated (and thus most likely broken) system once you start updating new packages. There is probably a way of adding some frozen repo (see first link) to get old packages when installing new software.

But if you really don’t want to update at all, you’re probably at the wrong address with any Arch-based distribution, but I’ll leave that decision up to you.

(Also on an unrelated note, it seems to be a one in one million case that an update broke your whole system. As long as you regularly update (i.e. once every week or more often), your system shouldn’t break. And there are probably lots of people here that will help you fix that one in a million case where it actually breaks)

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Thanks for your feedback, I did some digging and will force a specific date in the mirror list and “upgrade” via Pacman to go back to the packages from that date.

I’ve only been running Endeavour (my first Arch-based OS) for a couple months now, had everything the way I wanted it, and already, twice, update broke my system - not one in a million.

I would much prefer to keep things updated of course, but I’m not an advanced user and cannot afford to spend hours away from work troubleshooting things whenever an update breaks things (which, again, has been twice in two months now).

Other than that, everything else in the OS meets my needs and I would love to contribute, learn, donate, etc., but (in good faith!) how can I do that if I can’t even use it as my primary OS?

I don’t want to derail this thread into a discussion about the philosophy of system maintenance, but it seems that something in your update process (or maybe some package/ specific system setup) might be at fault or you were just super unlucky. As previously suggested, I personally would advise to open a thread on that issue, but that’s up to you.
Feel free to continue this thread if you choose to go ahead with the “no update” process and encounter further issues :+1:

Thanks, I added comments on the two existing threads on the topic already, hopefully someone can help.