How long between updates?

i didnt know about checkupdates. thanks! makes things easier
(im quite new to the arch world)

3 Likes

Hmm, that sounds plausible. In any case, in the 1.5 years I’ve been using EOS, I’ve observed much greater stability. :+1:t2:

1 Like

My prime partner, lovely by all means, but computer maintenance is’nt her thing. There has been two insances when she forgot to update for 3 - 4 weeks, and now lastly for five weeks.

I don’t know if it was shear luck on her behalf as there were no major problems updating but, as fbodymechanic says, run a keyring update before anything else,

4 Likes

My recommendations.

4 Likes

Just thought I would point out that eos-shifttime makes the hops much easier on you! :grin: I use that on my mirror server all the time to stay 1 week behind current to allow time for fixes ‘just in case’ - but it also works great if some of my multi-builds get left off the update bandwagon for a while…

5 Likes

Here’s a fancy version of the checkupdates functionality you can keep handy in your .bashrc file:

3 Likes

One thing you could do with the shelf machine is use command

UpdateInTerminal

which should automatically take care of updating the Arch keyring before other packages.

But to enable that automatic feature, edit file

/etc/eos-script-lib-yad.conf

and set this value:

EOS_UPDATE_ARCH_KEYRING_FIRST=yes

Of course you can use this command on other machines as well. :wink:

8 Likes

About once a day occasionally I leave it a few days when my data is running low

1 Like

Always updating … :wink:

1 Like

Once a day, whether it’s needed or not! :stuck_out_tongue:

1 Like

Before reboot or shutdown - sometimes twice per day and sometimes once every month :grimacing:

1 Like

I might have mentioned it before (no kidding) - but I have constant (conky-driven) info on the count of updates, and their names - so I update when the counts grows a bit, and/or when I spot something I want updated, and/or when I want something to distract for a moment or two while ‘thinking’. All good reasons, right? :grin:

Edit: I should also mention that this applies to my ‘main’ system - differing strategies are in use elsewhere, because the updates aren’t quite as ‘knowable’ where I am not logged in! Could be a week or more between checking out other builds, could be longer on another machine - or could be weekly but a week behind such as on my mirror server (I serve EndeavourOS and chaotic-aur on an EnOS build). Just about ALL methods of deciding work fine the majority of the time - with even LONG pauses being viable with some caveats (such as perhaps needing a keyring update, or needing to be ‘step-updated’ in smaller increments).

Basically YOUR way is the RIGHT way :grin:

2 Likes

On my machine I use every day, I update it mostly once a day. On my laptop, however, I update on average every week.

1 Like

I update everyday, twice a day. I have other drives with this OS installed as backups (in particular another ssd drive) and if you wait long enough there have been times where I’ve seen over 500 updates in a single instance. Crazy? No this is what I’ve seen. The only risk you encounter is getting a partial or corrupted file on your system during the download or an out of date gpg signature on a file from some maintainer from out of date signature sources. So far the system has worked well for me. I also always burn the latest ISO file on DVD and thumb drive for reassurance that if my system totally crashes I can get it re-installed. Maybe not the best advice but this is what I do.

Rich :wink:

1 Like

I’ve been at both extremes. I update between several times a day and once in 6 months.

2 Likes

Desktop (main usage) once a day. Laptop usually once a week. If I leave it for say, a month or two then I may have more pacnew files to deal with. If you leave it for a long time I would recommend updating your mirrorlist first otherwise things can get a bit messy!

1 Like

I run updates when I think about it, install a new package, or am awaiting a new kernel.

1 Like

You could just ssh into their machine or use No Machine. I use ssh for my Debian server and my wife’s laptop at work. Never had an issue, yet.

1 Like

That would work if they left it on, but they don’t. But it’s not that big of a deal, I just turn it on, run the update and am done with it while they are at school.

1 Like

This is especially true when you only use your machine every six months.

2 Likes