Gnome seems fine for me

I’ve seen lots of negativity on the gnome de over the internet, but for me if you remove all your thoughts and ideas of how a desktop should be, gnome is working quite well as a workspace centric environment which i think is a innovative idea, no clutter with tray icons and desktop items.

Do you agree with me on this?

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I have a great experience with gnome on 14’ laptop, also wayland works flawless for me, it’s perfect for fractional scaling on different monitors with various resolutions. I had not graphical glitches or freezes, it is very well polished to me. I use zero extensions…

However, on 15’ the UI drives me a bit nuts, I prefer more classical environment. I used KDE, but found myself using cinnamon for a couple of days. I think overall I prefer much more the esthetics of gtk apps.

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It works great imo as long as you don’t use extensions.

For me to use it to my liking though, I need extensions. . . So there’s my normal dilemma.

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I know that is the common argument. But on KDE I tried to make changes in global themes and that’s when things started to act weird a bit. Most forum users praise KDE over gnome, but then acknowledge that in KDE the global theme can be glitchy.

My point is that if using as vanilla as possible, then no problem :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

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I feel like using kde or any of the other environment is like trying to mimic old windows, while the new windows is trying to mimic linux’s desktop environments with workspaces etc. Its getting weird.

possibly, I can’t stand the look of windows 10 and it’s start menu, I think I switched long ago, windows 7 was ok to me. I haven’t tried win 11. KDE looks really nice, they made a lot of progress, but also gnome, I was very impressed when I tried gnome 40 for the first time. Gnome is especially great on laptop with gestures and touchpad.

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Add long as everything is dark, I don’t really change themes much. But I understand that.

Themes are one thing. Dash to dock, pop shell, hell -even just adding a button for hibernate (seriously, you need an e xtension to hibernate?!?).

KDE is not perfect though.

Stock it does. Much like GNOME mimics apple in a lot of ways.

KDE can be made to look like whatever you can imagine though. It’s just a starting point. GNOME has very minimal UI options without an extension. So by the time you get it as you want. It’s update time and back to square 1.

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I agree, in the past when using gnome I did all that. But when trying gnome 40, I did not have much time because of work and just used what I got out of the box. Using a couple of months it turned out ok. But I am a minimalist, also like wm like i3 and qtile.

The major tweak for me (learned from wm) was to add keybindings aka keyboard shortcuts. Once I had that, no need for dash to dock, I know my programs and keybindings. Else I press on overview button and search for app.

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Oh yeah I had to use arc menu to add in hibernate so my initial post is flawed, I guess I can agree some things are missing.

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100%. I loved it so much, I added it to my KDE like 7 months ago and it’s fantastic!!

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totally, you kind of have to like it out of the box to have a good time.

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To make a very calculated user experience as their major market with Ubuntu is the corporate world, they give minimal user options. That way if the employee (read, not a computer enthusiast) had an issue, they can easily help them.

To do this, less control to the user is better. KDE is very much an enthusiast platform. They cater to two substantially different crowds.

Arch tends to be much more in tuned with enthusiasts. And imo, tends to bring in more “KDE type users”. Ubuntu is more corporate and people who just need to work and they don’t want them wasting time not working.

This is not to say one is better than the other. But if you’re at a place that serves the best pizza in the world, and yet you decide to order a steak. . And then complain the steak sucks. . . Well, you should go to a steakhouse. . . It’s all in what you want/need.

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To be fair, I dislike how Ubuntu added in all the extra features, if we are going to make the case that kde can be tweaked to your hearts desire, I feel like gnome can achieve them too but not as much as kde if we imagine all the kwin scripts, docks as extensions.

I decided to try Gnome and I like it… It’s clean, fast… Using since Oct 21, so 3 weeks now…
I was using XFCE, I thought it would be hard to adapt to Gnome, but it wasn’t… at all

Edit: I’m not using extensions

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The only caveat I have to that is the kwin scripts (that I’ve used) don’t seem to break with each update. And I only use two and one I don’t need anymore since they built in the center window script I was using right into KDE now. The only script I use is krohnkite now.

Also, you said “to be fair” and all I could think of was Letterkenny.

FYI- likely NSFW - yes NSFW (language)

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Well, to be fair, I decided to try gnome due to wayland… :slight_smile:

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To be faiiiiiiiirrrrrrrrrr…

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Extensions breaking at every update seems like a way of life for gnome users, its the equivalent of arch users using aur.

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I completely understand.

Although I have had very few AUR things break over the years, I can understand the equivalent. Having to deal with both would be awful.

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Look at this and tell me its not windows trying to be linux. :rofl: