Considering Moving to Ubuntu

That’s really great information. Thank you for sharing your experience.

I’m almost embarrassed I was considering Ubuntu at the beginning of this post. :joy:

I definitely have learned patience when some games stop working, and sometimes after a month or two, they start working again. But games that I’m referring to have Gold ratings on Proton DB, while also having recent reports of people saying they work great without tweaks, on Arch Linux or even EOS no less. It might be Steam Native vs Steam Runtime that is at the root of some of my issues, or maybe if I dug into Proton logs and deciphered some of that nonsense I could find a fairly straightforward fix.

I’ve been at this crossroads a few times. I see all your reasons. Budgie was a second class citizen in Fedora, too.
It’s Arch. Sometimes you have to go a few rounds with it. But when it cracks, spits, and hums this is like a prizefighter.
It’s the age-old linux ‘how hard do I want to fight when there are other fish in the sea?

I’m pretty much a moron simpleton. All my visits to the crossroads end with:
“apt or apt-get? this is stupid. how do I install? or update? both? wait, they are different? Oh God why is synaptic so awful?”

and this repeats itself at every crossroads like sisyphus then I mosey back where I came from…

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Personally I would never go down the Ubuntu road. You will find the same fork in the road that leads to a dead end and the only way back is to turn around. Arch has many more roads to travel and they bring with it new directions. You’ll find with games there are always going to be issues with many different platforms. I’d stick with EOS! It’s much more colorful … on the purple side!

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Yep and the Arch wiki even tells you such. I recalled seeing it when I was trying to figure out the difference between steam and steam-native.

Funny how the person who started the conversation (me) never got back until everyone else shared their opinion.

@proficiency
If gaming is your highest priority and you want the best support: Windows 11.

Someone forgot M$ Recall already got exploited. If you NEED Winblows for a certain task, use Tiny11 already, and make sure to make an M$ account or any other crap like that. Of course, :enos: ftw.

@mbod
And if you are willing to use the gnome desktop (as I do) you are getting a state-of-the-art distro. It also offers Plasma and otehr desktops. But gnome is the lighthouse desktop.

Let’s not forget they’re purposefully breaking FreeDesktop.Org specs with their non-compliant FDO icon theme as well as other isolated decisions like Ubuntu.

Anyways, just like @ricklinux said:

Personally I would never go down the Ubuntu road.

I wouldn’t either. Linux Mint 19.1 to 19.3 still traumatizes me. Unfixable broken packages, ouch.

At first I thought this post was a flame post and that’s why I clicked. When I read the OP, I wrote my mini-rant, lol.

This thread has probably served its purpose. (obligatory end with new line for POSIX, lol)

This statement is too short to explain what is going on. In fact, the FDO icon theme standard is criticized even by KDE developers.

Please read: https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/xdg/xdg-specs/-/issues/132

It says: “Clearly FDO icon theming as currently implemented is not meeting the needs of app developers.”

In my experience, gaming on Arch based distros is much easier for multiple reasons. Games break due to new updates and if the developer cares, they will do something to help out or someone that’s very smart fixes the issue, one way or another. Fixes for games on ProtonDB, from what I noticed, are pretty universal. Outside of Steam, some games require patches done by the community and very often, they are on the AUR. For example, take the package xorg-xwayland-osu. Due to Wayland’s forced VSync on Wine apps, alongside, I believe, other things, players have modified this package so they can use Wayland and play osu! without issues. Without it, I personally can’t play the game under Wayland. If it wasn’t on the AUR, I would have had to manually compile it, which while not super complicated, most likely, it is wasted time on my part.

I noticed a lot of people here are dismissive of Ubuntu and I agree. Ubuntu isn’t exactly great OOTB, in my opinion, but I would say if you want to try it out, go ahead. Maybe you will find that Ubuntu works better for you. Maybe it doesn’t work better for you. Who knows?

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Just my $0.02…

If you want to switch from Arch and want to keep gaming in a non-problematic way, then Fedora is a more suitable option than Ubuntu - always latest & greatest with less controversial decisions about the distro.
And Nobara might be even better, since most of the game-related tweaks are already present while installing the OS on your computer.

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Sorry to say but it’s irrelevant to whether Recall AI exploited or not. The objective is playing games with the highest level of support and convenient. Just playing game.

Sure you can use Tiny11 or whatever, the point is to use Windows to accomplish comfortable gaming without hassle.

Like I said, most people do not care about security as many people in certain circles of technology enthusiast. People just want to get their job/tasks done.

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I’m a guy who uses both ends day in and day out. So, I do agree with @proficiency regarding gaming. All the games are built and tested for Windows. When it comes to the jargon that gets added to Windows we can remove them. I recommend “Atlas OS” or you can create your own “playbook” and remove the things you don’t want.

But you said you don’t want to go back to Windows. Then I suggest being ready to roll up your sleeves and get dirty.

I won’t recommend any Linux distro for gaming because Linux and gaming will always have issues. But I would like to point out that the “Valve” company behind “Steam” chose Arch to power their “Steam Deck” above all the platforms mentioned here. So, there’s some weight in that decision.

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That’s perfectly fine and it is respectable stance. If you just want to play games, perhaps Windows is the best option.

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@elektrik Since you’ve become far more proficient with Arch - i.e., the most vibrant, well-documented, forward-moving Linux foundation - it seems ill-advised to abandon all that knowledge and control to become beholden to what will inevitably be a more lethargic (and perhaps corporate-compromised) platform.

And, if you’re operating on an Arch platform, I can think of no more accessible and community-spirited flavor than EOS. Having been around the constellation of options, as you’ve seen firsthand, EndeavourOS is awesome.

So, yes Dorothy, you and Toto are already home :wink: … just click your heels three times … there’s no place like home … there’s no place like home … :tornado:

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2 Suggestions:

  • Easy flaweless gaming with Windows as 2nd OS: Stay with EOS on an encrypted disk/partition. Just use Win10/11 as second boot option for those few games, that won’t work with EOS. Booting up Windows will take less time than digging into every problem when trying to play your games. Depending on your game selection, that surely changes by time, you won’t recognize the time you “invest” in rebooting.

  • If Ubuntu seems to be your alternate linux choice, maybe give Tuxedo OS a try. While I have EOS/Win as dual boot on my workstation I use Tuxedo OS solely on my notebook. It works great with Steam and with Epic (via heroic). Tuxedo OS is based on Ubuntu, but removed the snap support in favor of pure deb distribution. Tuxedo releases choosen packages continuously, so you are more up-to-date than an Ubuntu.

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Sorry to say but it’s irrelevant to whether Recall AI exploited or not. The objective is playing games with the highest level of support and convenient. Just playing game.
Sure you can use Tiny11 or whatever, the point is to use Windows to accomplish comfortable gaming without hassle.

The point is that no one would play Monika DDLC when their data is accessible by malware at any point, since M$ Recall is encrypted at rest only. Saying Windows is good because it is most compatible with games is like saying Linux is bad because you can’t spy on people with it. You’re perpetuating the cycle here.

Just use Win10/11 as second boot option for those few games, that won’t work with EOS. Booting up Windows will take less time than digging into every problem when trying to play your games. Depending on your game selection, that surely changes by time, you won’t recognize the time you “invest” in rebooting.

TBH, I do this but use Tiny11. I don’t play many Steam or GOG games anyway.

Tuxedo OS is based on Ubuntu

And inherits all its disadvantages. Just saying. (I have a grudge against apt)

Don’t just consider, simply test, take a little time and draw your conclusions.

There’s no point asking people on the internet, you’ll get all kinds of opinions possible.

  • Different hardware, so the experience will never be the same.
  • It’s kind of fashionable to talk bad about Ubuntu, they criticize X, but ignore Y of its distros. They are either very stereotypical opinions or some bad experience, usually the person is a beginner and has a bad opinion and takes it as absolute truth. Other times it’s because they read it or saw it on the internet, especially famous YouTubers who use this to move the algorithm.
  • What is good or bad also varies from person to person. There are people who think it takes 3 seconds to open an app in Snap to be absurd. Others don’t. There are people who think PPAs are bad, but they use AUR. There are those who say that Snaps are closed-source, but this is a lie and that somehow, the server being closed-source influences something. Does anyone audit Arch servers? Many people talk nonsense without technical knowledge.

Anyway, test Ubuntu, test Fedora, Nobara, OpenSuse, etc. And draw your own conclusions. Feel the real problems firsthand and decide. It’s a waste of time, but the learning process is enjoyable.

These right here. I am currently in the annoying process of trying to convert artists, animators, and designers who only care about using industry standard apps to switch to open source and Linux. Though I know the benefits of Arch and prefer Arch, I don’t mention Arch to them unless I mention Siduction Linux.

Why? Because they may be “art/design-savvy”, but they are not tech-savvy. If I want them to use open source, I have to make it as easy as possible because they are not really open to change. Most of them still use MS Edge or Safari on their computers. Imagine how hard it would be for them to use Arch.

All this to say, yes, it is annoying to hear someone using Arch complain that Ubuntu is easier or works better, they even say this for Manjaro (which is why I always say it is not real Arch).
BUT, they are still using Linux.

If the whole world used Linux, Ubuntu and Fedora would have the majority of users. This probably already the case.

Most people want convenience, not control. If they are on Linux, they have done 80% of the work already.

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I don’t think there’s any harm in switching distros. Sometimes bleeding edge fits in your life, sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes you just want things to be stable while you focus on other things and that sounds like where you are at right now. Variety is the spice of life.

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The wife and I use Fedora everyday. I have a laptop on Debian. I personally avoid snaps at all costs. But if we’re arguing snaps and flatpaks and not Google or Microsoft, I feel like we’re already in a pretty good space.

My wife loves Fedora. It just works, and that’s all she needs.

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I thought I’m using EOS not Arch just because it works i.e. for convenience not control/customization.:man_shrugging:t6:
People have different definitions of “convenience”.