New Ryzen Linux Hardware

Why would this bother you? From what I can see, they all have to do with managing the hardware of their laptops.

Correct. Then wouldn’t they be “proprietary?”

If one replaces Windows completely with EnOS on a ‘regular’ computer (Dell, Asus, Acer, Lenovo, etc.), in general the drivers included with the machines all work with whatever Linux OS one chooses to install (providing it is not one of those which use only free software).

But I don’t know what would happen if I installed EnOS on a System76 computer (assuming I did not install the drivers from the AUR or if those AUR drivers were not updated when necessary).

That’s what bothers me.

Lawrence

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Sure, but I don’t think proprietary is inherently bad in this case as they have all these drivers open-sourced on github. I don’t have a System76 laptop, but I’m sure they’d work just fine out of the box with a different distro like most other laptops when you slap Linux on them. But, just like many other laptops, if you want better control of your hardware on Linux, you need to install hardware specific drivers.

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Nope. The AUR packages are all OSS. Actually, the entire laptop firmware uses Coreboot, an open-source bios. A system76 machine is as OSS as you can get without going full .

The only drivers necessary are the backlight one. The rest are Gnome-shell extensions that you don’t really need.

It will work just fine.

The drivers are maintained and packaged by System76 directly. They are always on point.

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Well then I hope you got the Fedora certified Thinkpads then. Though, they don’t seem to offer Ryzen fedora certified machines.

I would kill for a Ryzen 4000 CPU and AMD Radeon GPU Linux certified machine. Though, I still don’t know how to set up AMD switchable graphics. With that said, Optimus Manager seems to be working on getting AMD GPUs working so that’s great. Edit: nvm, you guys just made a wiki post for that. Niice!

@lhb1142
Here’s the experience from one of our users with System76. This is before they offered any Ryzen laptops. I have been bugging them to come out with some hardware to include Ryzen with AMD graphics. Now it’s happening.

Thanks to jiibus, SuppaMan, and ricklinux for replying to me with concise and good answers.

Because of my concerns, I have never bought a System76 computer but, now that ZaReason is officially “dead,” and as i want to support a “Linux-only” computer seller, I think that I will buy one of theirs the next time I need a new computer (though I hope that that won’t be for a few years into the future).

Thanks very much again.

Lawrence

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In addition to System76 have a look at

Fedora or Ubuntu cert Thinkpads

Starlabs

SLimbooks

Juno Computers

Tuxedo computers

According to the press release in July, ALL Thinkpads should be certified with Ubuntu, RHEL, and Fedora at this point. They are not all available pre-built, but they should be certified with all of them.

Regardless, if anyone wants a Ryzen Thinkpad, I can personally say the T495 (3000 series) works great with Endeavour and Debian (backports kernel) and T14 (AMD) (4000 series) works great with Endeavour.

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I do not. They literally just started selling them.

I have a Dell 7548, A 3rd gen Thinkpad X1 Carbon, and a Thinkpad E455. I believe all are from 2015. I have paid a grand total of less than $600 for all 3 of them including all upgrades and repairs. The only Ryzen computer is the E455 unfortunately. I have had a number of AMD computers in the past and have always really loved them. The last new computer I purchased was a Compaq Back in 2005 when I went off to college that promptly was stolen from my dorm. I only had enough money for used and gifted computers until recently, but I just don’t like most of the computers I see anymore, and the ones I do are like $1500+. I’m to the point now, Arch/Endeavour works so well. . . why bother with a new computer? If I were to buy one, it would be to support someone I care about. BUT, the product still needs to be worth paying for. I don’t want to buy a nice expensive new computer that I end up liking less than my $380 X1 Carbon, and I would be furious if it didn’t type as nice as my $68 E455. . .

I had an HP with AMD that was an utterly fantastic computer. I have had a number of hand me down Dell’s over the years. And Even my first real laptop - my compaq I “bought” for someone else, was AMD. I’ve always prefered AMD to others.

This is precisely on my radar. . . Come on offerup. . . I’ll get one eventually. Any Thinkpad that ends in xxx5! Come on AMD

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If you like to have it ram-heavy, just make sure to get one with 16GB soldered. The T495 was the first common (AMD) thinkpad that has only a singular DIMM for memory, so if you get one that has 8GB soldered, you’re stuck with the 8/12/16/24/40, no balanced dual-channel other than 16GB total.

I’m actually trying to find a decent priced L14 (AMD) w/ 1080P, since that still has dual DIMMs (and get rid of my Latitude 7410).

So. . . I really want a T485s? Does that exist? And 12 - 24 ram is plenty for me realistically. I rarely go over like 5-6 when using any of my computers.

A485, there is no T series for the AMD in that timeframe. I had an A485. If you get it, make sure the BIOS is up to date. IT was a PILE OF GARBAGE when it first released with all sorts of issues due to BIOS. But they fixed every single one of them eventually. The A485 has dual batteries and still has 2 DIMMs. GREAT laptop in the end, as long as you realize you’re getting GARBAGE battery life with the Zen-based Ryzens (2000 series). Mind you if you don’t mind the weight, going to the secondary 9-cell battery + internal will fix that issue.

That all sounds fine to me. I think I’ll probably just end up collecting Thinkpads forever at this point. Such great computers. I just want all of them.

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They are great laptops for anyone who actually USES laptops regularly. Hands down the best keyboards. While I love Dells Latitudes as well (obviously given how many I’ve had over the years, putting my number of Thinkpads to shame), the keyboards aren’t really competitive overall. They’re (generally) lighter, smaller, thinner than the Thinkpads, but once you set down and start having to type out a report, or a long email, etc. on them, the Thinkpad makes you not regret that couple extra ounces of weight.

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Not all. Intel ones are but the AMD ones aren’t yet certified for some reason.

Just picked up an HP Elitebook 845 G7 with Ryzen 4750U 8 cores / 16 threads, 32GB RAM / 1TB SSD… did a test install of Endeavour and everything works perfectly except for the screen brightness function keys… not a big deal. So, going to do a dual boot setup for a while as I still need some things in windoze… :slight_smile:

Glad to hear as i am also looking at one of these. Good to know the backlighting issue. It may or may not be solvable because of hardware limitations.

This was the best price I could find for the 32GB/1TB that I wanted. Also the screen is the upgraded 1000 nit with the sure view privacy option… no complaints so far… really like the build quality, and the back cover is very easy to remove with only 5 phillip head screws. https://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-EliteBook-845-G7-14-1000-nit-Ryzen-7-PRO-4750U-32GB-RAM-1TB-SSD-3Yr-Warranty/124453069332

I see it has Intel XMM 7360 for 4G LTE Support. So does it not have Ethernet? It doesn’t list that in the specs.