Grub 2:2.06.r322.gd9b4638c5-1 won't boot and goes straight to the BIOS after update

This should really go into the warning (heads-up) thread, @moderators !
@dalto 's fingers must be dripping blood by now… @sradjoker

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Indeed, following the procedure I ended-up with 2 entries:

EndeavourOS-grub (new one)
and
EndeavourOS (the old one)

Make sure you select the right one in the boot menu.

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Thank you so much for guide @Lugh and patience @dalto

The guide from @Lugh worked for me and everything is fine now.

Love you! :heart:

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Great ! Happy that I could help ! @dalto is the hero here !

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Done. @sradjoker wrote something earlier. I merged it in.

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…is here, please ALL, follow it exactly:
https://forum.endeavouros.com/t/the-latest-grub-package-update-needs-some-manual-intervention/30689/4

There shouldn’t be any more questions left, hardly, thereafter!

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I would add an example to this sentence “where xxx is the boot entry corresponding to EndeavourOS-grub” (e.g. efibootmgr -o 0002,0003,0001) because newbies could fail.

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@dalto , @sradjoker !

Done.

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A post was split to a new topic: Booting from vmlinuz-linux image file with btrfs in rEFInd

To be repeated…

Please do! :smile:

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Hi,
After the recent update deleted my grub I’m trying to restore it using chroot following this site https://discovery.endeavouros.com/system-rescue/arch-chroot-for-efi-uefi-systems/2021/03/ but I’m running into some problems. For a start here is the output after I run sudo fdisk -l
The disk I am running EndeavourOS on is IRIDIUM PRO

Disk /dev/sda: 223.57 GiB, 240057409536 bytes, 468862128 sectors
Disk model: IRIDIUM PRO     
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 8E62129F-1E34-6F41-A5E4-7A2C8D829923

Device      Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1    4096    618495    614400   300M EFI System
/dev/sda2  618496 468857024 468238529 223.3G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/sdb: 953.87 GiB, 1024209543168 bytes, 2000409264 sectors
Disk model: ADATA SU800     
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x3dd02f8e

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1        2048 2000406527 2000404480 953.9G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/sdc: 931.51 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Disk model: ST1000DM003-1SB1
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xa96dd874

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdc1        2048 1953521663 1953519616 931.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 894.25 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Disk model: Force MP510                             
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: A168EE3C-3DFD-4A6E-9F24-CB17FC0ECE36

Device           Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/nvme0n1p1    2048    1085439    1083392   529M Windows recovery environment
/dev/nvme0n1p2 1085440    1290239     204800   100M EFI System
/dev/nvme0n1p3 1323008 1875384319 1874061312 893.6G Microsoft basic data


Disk /dev/sdd: 1.82 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors
Disk model: EXTERNAL_USB    
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x87d2ec79

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sdd1  *     2048 3907026943 3907024896  1.8T  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/sde: 7.21 GiB, 7743995904 bytes, 15124992 sectors
Disk model: USB DISK 2.0    
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x0019693f

Device     Boot Start      End  Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sde1  *     2048 15124991 15122944  7.2G  c W95 FAT32 (LBA)


Disk /dev/loop0: 1.6 GiB, 1714974720 bytes, 3349560 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


So following the article I linked above I was trying to run two commands:

sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
^this one doesn’t produce any output so I assume it works fine

sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi
^after running this one I get the following message:

mount: /mnt/boot/efi: mount point does not exist. dmesg(1) may have more information after failed mount system call.

After that I tried to run dmesg(1) it runs into a syntax error and says the ‘(’ is unexpected. I also tried running just dmesg but it produces so much output that I can’t possibly go through all of it.

I also run btrfs subvolume list -p /mnt to check if I have BTRFS and it seems I don’t as the message is as follows:
ERROR: not a btrfs filesystem: /mnt ERROR: can't access '/mnt'

I also tried to run sudo arch-chroot /dev/sda1 /mnt but it returned the following error
ERROR: Can't create chroot on non-directory /dev/sda1

Some other useful information might be that I am running dualboot with windows on a separate disk (Force MP510) also none of my systems are encrypted

Any help would be much appreciated,
Thanks

/dev/sda1 is your efi partition.

You probably want to mount /dev/sda2 to /mnt and /dev/sda1 to /mnt/boot/efi after that.

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After trying to set the ranking using efibootmgr and having no success, selecting EndeavourOS-grub as the first entry in my UEFI worked. I’m back on my system.

Thank you for your help.

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As @dalto said arch-chroot requires that you mount the root file system of the install.

sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt

Then mount the the efi partition for boot

sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi

Then you chroot to the mounted install

sudo arch-chroot  /mnt

sudo arch-chroot /mnt is enough :slight_smile:

That solved my problem, I have regained access to my system now.
Many thanks :slight_smile:

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Oh …did i get that wrong?

Edit: Me dumb! :rofl:

Edit2: I fix! But too late…

yes I used sudo arch-chroot /mnt and it worked after setting the mounts correctly

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